2019 PLENARY KEYNOTE PROGRAM

Tuesday, March 26

1:25 Plenary Keynote Session: Organizer's Remarks

1:30 - 2:00 1000, 2000, 3000 .... N Cycles from Li-Ion Cells: How Large Can N Be?

Jeff Dahn, PhD, Professor of Physics and Atmospheric Science, NSERC/Tesla Canada Industrial Research Chair, Dalhousie University

Our laboratory has developed many methods to help rank the lifetime of cells in relatively short duration experiments (coulombic efficiency, isothermal microcalorimetry, etc.) so that cell developers and users can move rapidly to find next generation chemistries. In this presentation I will describe another powerful method and give examples of how it has been useful in developing outstanding cells that last many thousands of charge-discharge cycles and last many years.

2:00 - 2:30 Battery System Engineering Challenges and Opportunities for the Cell, Pack and System

James Lim, PhD, Battery System Engineering Manager, Google

Designing and verifying a well-balanced battery for safety, reliability, performance, availability, and cost requires strong cross-functional team interactions during system integration and product launch. The opportunities are being able to provide viable options, evaluate tradeoffs, and deliver battery solutions associated with next generation products.

Wednesday, March 27

1:45 Plenary Keynote Session: Organizer's Remarks

1:50 Shep Wolsky Battery Innovator Award

2:00 PANEL DISCUSSION: What Innovations/Advancements Do OEMs Need to Enable Near-Term, Large-Scale Production?

Moderator:

Celina Mikolajczak, Director of Engineering, Energy Storage Systems, Uber


 

Panelists:

Mohamed Alamgir, PhD, Research Director, LG Chem

Micheal Austin, Vice President, BYD US Operations (BYD America-IT, BYD Motors, BYD Energy)

Craig Rigby, Vice President Technology, Power Solutions, Johnson Controls

Bob Taenaka, Technical Specialist, Battery System Development, Ford Motor Company

What do OEMs need for near term, large-scale innovation? Can the global battery R&D community deliver on what advancements OEMs need for large-scale production? Our distinguished panel will discuss what they need to innovate and what they anticipate their future requirements will be. In addition, our panelists will discuss what innovation can be achieved to meet the OEMs requirements.

Thursday, March 28

4:40 Closing Plenary Keynote Session: Organizer's Remarks

4:40 - 5:40pm PANEL DISCUSSION: Solving the Innovation Barrier for Production of Improved Li-Ion

Moderator:

Brian Barnett, President, Battery Perspectives


 

Panelists:

Michael Fetcenko, Director, Global Licensing, BASF Battery Materials, BASF

Tobias Glossman, Senior Engineer, Mercedes-Benz Research and Development North America

Bruce Miller, Technology Strategist, Dell

Donald R. Sadoway, PhD, John F. Elliott Professor of Materials Chemistry, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Paul Schiffbanker, Product Manager Battery Systems, AVL

Demands for improved lithium-ion are increasing even while markets are expanding dramatically amidst relentless cost reduction pressures. New materials, components and technologies are required, and an unprecedented level of R&D is responding. Battery manufacturers and their suppliers face enormous engineering and investment challenges ramping up production. One consequence is a major innovation barrier:  long multi-year qualification periods and technologies “frozen” for manufacturing. This culture requires screening of new technologies in complete cells. Most innovators do not make cells or know how to demonstrate realistic cell-level performance. This panel of experts will examine these challenges and consider approaches to unblock innovation.

* The program is subject to change without notice, due to unforeseen reason.

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